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jenlindblad

writer // curator /// stockholm // new york
hej [at] jenniferlindblad [dot] com

Carl-Johan Rosén's project “I speak myself into an object” is a book consisting only of the programming code the computer needs to print the book.
Last week I saw CHR give a reading from the book, super interesting because the gibberish of the code is transformed into a kind of poetry. The project gives a whole new meaning to the expression “I publish, therefore I am.”

Carl-Johan Rosén's project “I speak myself into an object” is a book consisting only of the programming code the computer needs to print the book.

Last week I saw CHR give a reading from the book, super interesting because the gibberish of the code is transformed into a kind of poetry. The project gives a whole new meaning to the expression “I publish, therefore I am.”

— 1 year ago with 15 notes
#carl-johan rosen  #digital  #art  #publishing  #computers  #programming 
This Painting is Not Available in Your Country by Paul Mutant

This Painting is Not Available in Your Country by Paul Mutant

(Source: hifas, via notational)

— 1 year ago with 3980 notes
#art  #painting  #irony 

jtotheizzoe:

Mathematical Films of Manfred Mohr

Just stumbled across this collection of digital math and geometry films created by pioneering digital artist Manfred Mohr in the early 1970’s. This stuff puts most modern GIF artists to shame, and he made them in Fortran IV on a CDC 6400, which is considerably less powerful than Photoshop. They had to then be captured by a microfilm printer in order to be converted to 16 mm film!

Super cool look back at early digital art, though. Get inspired!  Here’s another, “Cube Transformation Study”:

Saw an exhibition of Manfred Mohr’s work at bitforms gallery (NY) two years ago that was spectacular.

(via emergentdigitalpractices)

— 1 year ago with 362 notes
#manfred mohr  #mathematics  #technology  #art  #bitforms  #digital art 

museumuesum:

Alfredo Jaar

One Million Finnish Passports, 1995

One million replicated Finnish passports, glass, 800 x 800 x 80 cm.

Finland has a historically stringent immigration policy, staunch nationalists they accept only a tiny fraction of the citizenship applications they receive, far less than any of their neighboring countries. Observing this, Jaar somehow managed to get 1 million Finnish passports printed up to represent the number of people who should have been nationalized as Finnish citizens but weren’t.  Now obviously this poses somewhat of a security risk, so the passports were housed behind a fortress of bullet-proof glass and the passports would be burned after the exhibit ended.

“I could say that everything I know about art, I learned as an architect. As an architect, I give myself a program, taking into account a specific space. Space is not just physical. It’s also social, cultural, political. Studying the space, I try to reach what we call the essence of the space. Then I combine that with the essence of what I am trying to say. All these elements are incorporated in the program, in which I have an objective.”

Guess I should be more proud to be a Finnish citizen.

(via l-ll-lll)

— 1 year ago with 342 notes
#finland  #art  #immigration  #passports  #alfredo jaar 
"I began writing about art because I was interested in the gap between what we see and what we say. Also I wanted to write about things in the world that stayed in the world after I had written about them, so whatever I wrote would remain in a live relationship with its subject. If you write about a concert or a play or a public event, that event is gone and nothing remains but the writing. Works of art, however, survive as an ongoing critique of the critique you have written. I like that."
David Hickey

(Source: blushisthecourt)

— 1 year ago with 28 notes
#art  #criticism  #writing about art 
"What we need more of is slow art: art that holds time as a vase holds water: art that grows out of modes of perception and making whose skill and doggedness make you think and feel; art that isn’t merely sensational, that doesn’t get its message across in ten seconds, that isn’t falsely iconic, that hooks onto something deep-running in our natures. In a word, art that is the very opposite of mass media."
— 2 years ago with 437 notes
#art  #time  #perception  #robert hughes 
Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale, Attese (1968)
Feeling a bit like this today.

Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale, Attese (1968)

Feeling a bit like this today.

— 2 years ago with 5 notes
#Lucio Fontana  #art  #red  #slash  #space  #personal 
March in Art

I saw so little art this month in comparison with February… but sometimes less is more. The month started off with the opening of Sturtevant’s show “Image over Image” at Moderna Museet which I wrote on for Art Observed.

Then my friend isismarina tipped me off on #BMWtatelive Performance Room where I watched a performance by Jerome Bel. As tweets flew by I tried to formulate an easy-to-answer question for the artist to answer in the Q&A which HE THEN DID! It was a bizarre experience, leading me to wonder if tweets are the new applause.

Later on in the month my friend Stefanie Hessler curated a fantastic week-long series of lectures, performances and workshops entitled Performing Recalcitrance, hosted by the Royal Institute of Art (KKH). As part of that I watched a hilarious artist talk by Mike Smith, heard Geert Lovink muse on Wikileaks and the relentless release of documents, and then engaged in three therapy sessions with a Viennese artist by the name of Clemens Krauss who previously trained as a psychotherapist.

Near the end of the month I went on my usual Hudiksvallsgatan gallery rounds, where I enjoyed the following three exhibitions:

Jakob Krajcik at Peter Bergman GalleryJeannin Schuurmans “Le Sous Marin” at Christian Larsen, and Jorma Puranen at Galleri Flach. The last is pictured below - the glares are in the photograph themselves and not by the lighting when I took the photo - supercool. I noticed a theme running through several galleries with photographers working with the blurring of memory.

That’s it for March, stay tuned for April.

— 2 years ago with 1 note
#art  #stockholm  #personal 
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus II, 2012. Cloud in room. Lambda print, 75x112 cm. Hotel MariaKapel, Hoorn. Photo: Cassander Eeeftinck Schattenkerk.
I like how the medium is “cloud in room.”
(See also)

Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus II, 2012. Cloud in room. Lambda print, 75x112 cm. Hotel MariaKapel, Hoorn. Photo: Cassander Eeeftinck Schattenkerk.

I like how the medium is “cloud in room.”

(See also)

— 2 years ago with 176 notes
#art  #Berndnaut Smilde  #clouds  #nimbus 
Februar(t)y

Now that March is here and I’m about to get really busy with my own projects I thought it would be nice to share some of the art experiences I had in February.

Feb 2: Went to the opening of Ai Weiwei at Magasin 3. Although it feels like I hear his name every ten seconds I’d never actually seen an exhibition by him, so it was great to finally do that. But I was so surprised by the work, it didn’t at all have the energy I associate him with! Couldn’t quite place the disconnect. The museum has created a great microsite they call a virtual reading room with loads of content which is worth checking out.

Feb 4: Went to the opening of TEJP at Färgfabriken where artists created an interactive climbing structure. It was fun to see kids running around in it, playful and interactive without being pretentious. Reminded me of something Casey would have made last year.

Feb 7: Went to the opening of "A Trip to the Moon" at Bonniers Konsthall, a show about art’s “love affair” with film. The installation was designed by the scenographer at Dramaten, the Swedish Royal Theater, and it shows. I really liked the way they installed this sculpture with a staircase next to it so that you could walk up and observe it from above. There’s also a parallel film program at Cinema Sture which I’m going to this weekend. Christiane Paul is speaking.

Feb 9: Went to the opening of Eija-Liisa Ahtila “Parallel Worlds” at Moderna Museet. Really, really beautiful work. Her videos are super long and impossible to see when you’re elbow-to-elbow with people so I need to get in there again. I’ve had several  friends tell me they cried when they watched it, but maybe that speaks more to our need for a curator therapy group than the work itself!

Feb 10: Saw this insane dance performance by Compagnie Marie Chouinard at Dansens Hus where the dancers walked around on crutches and with walkers. Reminded me of Lady Gaga’s Paparazzi video, or what a ballet choreographed by Matthew Barney would look like.

Feb 14: Went to Fotografiska and although most of it was bad I somehow got really into Aitor Ortiz's architectural photos. I'm not sure if it was intentional or not, but the photos were installed so that there was a beam of light coming from under the walls and because there was sometimes a strong streak of light in the image it looked like the light was emanating from the photograph itself.

Feb 17: Went to the opening of Uglycute retrospective at Marabouparken. I don’t get design.

Feb 18: Went to the opening of a show my friend Nina curated called "Be with me" at Peter Bergman gallery. I might be biased since I helped her install the show, but it was great. The afterparty was so much fun, and then we all headed to this fantastic sound art installation called freq_out at Moderna Museet which I’ll probably write more about.

Feb 23: Went to a debate at Tensta Konsthall about the future of funding for the arts in Sweden. Entitled “Contemporary Art and its Commercial Markets: A Symposium on Current Conditions and Future Scenarios," it dealt with director Maria Lind’s collaboration with the auction house Bukowski’s, which is owned by the Lundin family who are in the oil business. Sketchy! Should publicy-funded art institutions exhibit with private funding? Sure, but at what cost? At the end, one of the founders of the Swedish Kickstarter-like site crowdculture asked the panel if/how they saw online funding effecting the scene and nobody had enough energy to address him, which was too bad because it merited a whole conversation in and of itself.

Feb 25: Went to the open studios at IASPIS, the Swedish International Art Grants Committee. In his studio, Andjeas Ejiksson hosted a tea party including music, finger sandwiches, and three different types of tea. Really lovely. Ended up talking to an acquaintance about the living conditions of artists in New York, London, Berlin, and Stockholm, and the verity of the stereotype that Swedes are a cold people who take a long time to warm up but when they do they are absolutely wonderful.

Later that evening I found myself at Moderna Museet AGAIN for a Situationist International-inspired evening named after a book they were releasing a Swedish translation of Alla Kungens Hästar (All the King’s Horses) by Jaqueline de Jong, who was married to Guy Debord. Poetry/spoken word by Karl Larsson and Tris Vonna-Michell occurred and there is no better way to describe their pieces than GRYMT.

This past weekend, there was an interesting conference at Stockholm University about authenticity. A sweet older gentleman by the name of Jeremy Hawthorne presented on the significance of the "Hitler reacts" meme, and then some stiff academics talked about lithographs and stuff but who I really went to see was Anna Odell. Odell caused a media outrage in 2009 with her performance Unknown, Woman in which she faked a suicide attempt on Liljeholmsbron. She showed the footage from that notorious night, and it was really interesting to see after hearing so much about it. All I could think about when watching her was how scary her eyes are: big and watery, like she’s constantly on the verge of crying. She talked a little bit about the new project she was working on, but asked the audience members not to write anything about it publicly, so for now my lips are sealed.

Other things that happened in February: I remembered my Twitter existed, got into the show Äkta Människor, Sweden got a #royalbaby and said goodbye to the anchors who tell you what’s coming up next on TV in favor just audio (kind of sad!). But the best part of February by far was discovering swedishproblems, which makes life in this crazy country worth living.

— 2 years ago with 3 notes
#art  #stockholm  #personal 
WMMNA:In an interview for publik.dk, you said that there are many similarities between the way you live and work as artists and how an organic farmer live and work. Could you give us more details about this? 

KULTIVATOR:When we came to live close to the farm, we discovered that both we as artists and the organic farmer were struggling with "companies", or enterprises, that are based on cultural resp., ecological calculations as well as the usual economical one, and that this sometimes clashes. For example, when the EU farm subsidies suddenly changes and the farm has to adapt (or just suffer), or the art money gets directed differently and we must adapt (or just suffer). We both have offices full of unwanted paperwork... And we both always go for this cultural and ecological conviction in the end anyway because it´s the only thing that makes sense. Since the reason that we are publicly funded must be that we take responsibility for those two things first. 
Another parallel that we've talked about is like a shared frustration over being exclusive, when we rather would like to be accessible, mainstream, or whatever you call it. Like in the organic farm shop where people come from the city and they buy two peppers, and one small melon, instead of 10 kilos of potatoes. Or in a museum art show that only a certain small crowd visits. As if art and good food are luxury things, when they should belong to everybody.
— 2 years ago
#art  #farming  #funding  #sweden  #kultivator 
"Art is the power to be able to embed thought in materials. For the poet, poetry is the material."
Jerry Saltz

(Source: youtube.com)

— 2 years ago with 15 notes
#Jerry Saltz  #art  #power  #poetry  #inspiration 
"The emotional temperature of our response to art is plummeting towards absolute zero. How coldly can we look and still claim we are looking?"
James Elkins, Pictures and Tears
— 2 years ago with 26 notes
#art  #emotion  #James Elkins