Showing posts tagged armory.
x

jenlindblad

writer // curator /// stockholm // new york
hej [at] jenniferlindblad [dot] com

Ragnar Kjartansson, Scandinavian Pain, at The Armory Show 2012
Reportedly purchased by Moderna Museet for $55,000. (See also.)

Ragnar Kjartansson, Scandinavian Pain, at The Armory Show 2012

Reportedly purchased by Moderna Museet for $55,000. (See also.)

— 2 years ago with 8 notes
#Ragnar Kjartansson  #scandinavia  #scandinavian pain  #Moderna Museet  #armory 
Artlog’s Makeover

In the middle of this week’s New York art fair commotion, Artlog rolled out their new “handsome” website. Along with a slew of other improvements designed to track and give you the content you want, they now have a magazine that features video interviews with curators, gallerists, collectors, and artists. Bravo!

I joined Artlog in the first year they started up and it’s just fascinating to see how they’ve evolved since then. When I joined in 2008 as a gallerist, I used it primarily as a promotional and legitimizing tool: I uploaded exhibitions I had put together for emerging Scandinavian artists, and they were all glad to see how quickly the exhibition came up when you Googled their name. Just for laughs, here’s the old interface:

I haven’t had a chance to poke around extensively on the site, but based on their Armory Week coverage, I can already see that it lends a lot more insight (primarily through video) into the fairs and the people who run them. For someone who’s not currently stationed in New York, I am thrilled with how effortlessly it helps me keep tabs on the scene.

To keep things organized I’ve created a new profile for myself, so if you’re on Artlog follow me, and if you’re not, check it out! It’s handsome.

— 3 years ago with 14 notes
#artlog  #art fair  #armory  #pulse  #volta 
"Leandro Erlich’s “Subway” (2010), a video installed inside a real subway door, was totally entrancing. It stopped more than a few visitors dead in their tracks. What makes the work so hypnotizing is how the subway car moves and shifts while the viewers don’t."
This is a little kitschy, but it’s evoking NYC- and art-world-nostalgia. 

"Leandro Erlich’s “Subway” (2010), a video installed inside a real subway door, was totally entrancing. It stopped more than a few visitors dead in their tracks. What makes the work so hypnotizing is how the subway car moves and shifts while the viewers don’t."


This is a little kitschy, but it’s evoking NYC- and art-world-nostalgia. 
— 3 years ago with 3 notes
#art  #video  #armory  #new york city  #subway