The real challenge is to use museums to tell, with the same brilliance, depth, and power, the stories of the individual human beings living in these nations now. And so we must envision a new type of museum: instead of state-sanctioned institutions housed in monumental buildings that dominate neighborhoods (such as the Louvre or the Metropolitan) and try to tell a national history, we need to imagine a new type of more humble, modest museum that focuses on the stories of individual human beings, does not uproot objects from their environments to which they belong, and is able to turn the neighborhoods and streets it is in, and the homes and shops nearby, into integral components of its exhibitions. We will all gain a deeper understanding of humanity when modern curators turn their gaze away from the rich ‘high’ culture of the past—like those first novelists who tired of writing sagas about the lives of kings— and observe instead the lives we lead and the homes we live in, especially outside the Western world. The future of museums is inside our own homes.
Orhan Pamuk, “This is the Museum of the Future,” Newsweek. Read the entire article here.